Social networking and communication is nature’s antidote to that stress. Face and heart are both connected to the brain. Therefore, talking with someone face-to-face can help relieve your stress. Share your thoughts, feelings and troubles with another person. If you do not have a good friend at work, then become sociable with them and try engaging them together instead of grabbing their attention to your smart phone. A good listener is important to help you nervous system clam quickly. Do not pre-assume that the other person will solve your problems. All you need is a good listener. To help buffer you stress, make a co-worker your friend. If you feel you have no one to talk to, then do not dishearten and increase your stress levels, build new relationships, meet people with common interests by joining a community, a club, a gym, etc.

Stand Up and Get Moving

Exercising is one of the powerful ways to alleviate those stressors. Do whatever you like: swimming, aerobics, dancing or playing with peers or kids. Sweating will uplift your mood and sharpens your focusing ability. Focus on how you feel after you do exercise. Go for 30 minutes exercising at most of your days. If stress is mounting at work, then make a quick physical movement to regain your balance.

Eating Well

Eating has different effects on your body from happy feeling to sadness. If one eats too much it can make you feel lethargic, while too less eating will decrease your blood pressure making you feel anxious and more irritated. Focus on having short, healthy and 4–5 meals a day. Eliminate too much of refined carbohydrates and sugary foods from your diet, minimize it but do not skip on these. Avoid foods like caffeine, trans food, alcohol and pre-packaged and processed foods as they have adverse effect on your mood. Include omega-3 fatty acid rich foods to your diet.

Get Enough Sleep

Not only stress can cause insomnia, but lack of sleep too. In fact, decreased sleep hours can be more vulnerable than stress. This is because when you have properly rested, you can have a better and balanced emotional balance. This helps you in dealing with stress at workplace. Have a regular scheduled pattern of sleep and sleep for 8 hours. An hour before your bedtime, focus on quiet and soothing activities and do not sit in front of screens as light emitted form TVs, smartphones, computers and tablets suppresses your body’s melatonin production, thus disrupting your sleep.

Prioritize and Organize

When at work, practice simple steps to cope with your stress levels. A balanced schedule is very important. Never run late in a rush for office, rather plan to leave for office 10–15 minutes earlier. This will help in adjusting yourself from the very morning. Always work away from your work station to stay relaxed, recharged and more productive. If you have some unpleasant task to do in the day, plan it first do get over it early. Never take everything on once. Instead break projects by focusing on performing small parts in a manageable time. To let go off the unnecessary stress from your life at work, let that desire of handling every step go. Practice these steps to have a more pleasant day.

Break the Bad Habits Many of us have negative behavior and thoughts making our stress worse at work. If you can self-defeat those habits, then you will be better able to handle employer-imposed stress. Never set unrealistic goals for yourself. Just aim to do your best. Do not forcefully try to control things at work that are uncontrollable – people’s behavior. Instead focus on how you react to the problems – this is under your control. Always bear a positive attitude at work and avoid negative-thinking co-workers. Whenever you accomplish something, pat yourself even if no one else does.

FROM AWARD-WINNING AUTHOR DR GOVIND SHUKLA, NUTRITION EXPERT



Govind Shukla, Specializes in Pharmacology, Toxicology, Nutraceuticals & Herbal Drugs has published More than 100 research papers in National & International Journals. He is also a reviewer of International Journal of Pharmacology & pharmacotherapeutics, Chief editor of IJPNR Journal & Freelance Medical Writer for Different publication Groups including Lambert Academic Publishing Saarbrucken, Germany.

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